Allyson Johnson

Pieces of my Mind

Archive for the month “April, 2020”

Life in a COVID-19 Hot Spot – Week 8- the Shadow Comes Closer

Week 8 of Sheltering in Place.

I have developed a routine:

Monday morning is my Aerobics Class on Zoom.

Monday evening I go to a neighbor’s house and we maintain social distancing while tuning into a Continuing Education class focusing on the Roman historian Tacitus.  It’s not a pulse-pounding subject, but Donna is the only adult besides my husband that I see in person these days.

Tuesday morning  I jog around the neighborhood, and then I do a Story Time on Skype with my 3-year-old Granddaughter.

Tuesday afternoon I Zoom with my oldest friend, the one I was supposed to visit in Texas when all this started.

Wednesday morning Aerobics again.  In the evening we often call and chat with my sister in Sacramento.

Thursday morning jogging and Story Time again.  In the evening we often call and chat with my cousin in Ojai, California.

Friday morning Aerobics again.

Friday afternoon we Skype with my older son and his family in Sacramento. In the evening we often call and chat with my brother and his wife in Longview, Washington.

Saturday morning jogging again

Sunday morning I do yoga. In the evening we often call and chat with my brother in Texas.  In Texas they take the threat of COVID-19 a lot less seriously than us Hot-Spotters do.  My brother always asks me, “Do you actually know anyone who has had the virus?”

This week, I can answer, “Yes.”

One of my favorite professors at college died of COVID-19 last week.  He was in his 80’s, had had a stroke some years back, and was being cared for in one of the most well-equipped and competently-staffed elder care centers in the country.  Somehow, the virus, no respecter of money and privilege, made its way to him and had its way with him.

The world is a little bit darker.

 

Life in a COVID-19 Hot Spot – Week 7: Nature’s soft side shows in Spring

Nature has been throwing  us a lot of nasties in the last months – pandemic, killer tornados, smothering snow, torrential rain, and historic drought levels, to name a few.  And then, as if to make up for the tantrums, she sends us a Spring as lavish and luscious as any I can remember.  From native-plant gardens,  to cultivated rose gardens, to bursting containers, everything that has ever thought of blooming in my own garden and my neighborhood is out-doing itself this year.

Above: Poppies, sage, lupine, and blue-eyed grass from a native-plant garden in a nearby park.

Above: calendula, roses, raphiolepsis and orchids in my own garden.

Above: ranunculus border, tulips, wisteria, and rhododendron from a heritage garden nearby.

Above: cultivated roses at a neighboring university campus.

I hope these pix refresh you a bit, especially those of you who are still snowbound as well as lockdown-bound.  Spring still arrives, in spite of everything!

Life in a COVID-19 Hot Spot – Week 6 -Lockdown Extended 4 more weeks!

 

Cooped up with the morning paper and the hourly news, one would think the apocalypse is at hand.  A walk in nature is called for, but where does one go during lockdown?   Many parks are closed, or have closed the  parking lots  in order to discourage crowding, or at least have cordoned off picnic tables and playgrounds.

20200403_172027webWe found a little oasis not too far from our home – theBlackberry Farm Preserve.  Normally, this green dell offers visits to farm animals and truck gardens as well as grassy paths, but these tours and visits are now locked off.  The playground and picnic areas are also marked as dubious.  But the stately redwoods, the creek,  the twisted bay trees, the fearless deer, and the feral vincas are all still available to soothe the restless mind.

 

 

Life in a COVID-19 Hot Spot – Week 5 – in praise of Little Free Libraries

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Thank goodness for the Little Free Libraries which have popped up over the last several years in my neighborhood!  With the public libraries closed during Lockdown, these are the source for books I would not have thought of reading an movies I would not have thought of watching. These little neighborhood oases of exchange are so welcome!

Each library has its own style.  Some are shingled, some are stained wood, some are gaily painted.  I’ve seen one made from a doll house,  and one  splash- painted with peace symbols.  On my street is ones built into a stone pillar,  with an accompanying bench seat if you can’t wait to start reading. One is decorated inside with  origami flowers, and gives away origami bookmark.  One gives away colored pencils, sharpeners, and erasers as well as books.

And each has its own literary personality.  One  offers a lot of teenage fantasy novels featuring magic and quests.  One is almost exclusively filled with early-reader story books. One has a lot of 20200406_114628webclassy trade paperbacks which look like they were originally purchased for a book club. Another features a variety of interesting non-fiction.

20200407_080112webOf course, anything you put out for the public is liable to malicious abuse.  A neighbor had worked with her daughter’s Girl Scout troop to set up a Little Free Library in front of her house.  The girls decided it would be good to make it into a food pantry during the Lockdown, and stocked it with canned goods and dried pasta.  The next morning the door had been ripped off and the canned goods had been scattered around, dented, wrappers ripped off.  The debate began – was it vicious mean-spirited teens, or was it racoons attracted by the food?  A neighbor’s security camera settled the question several days later:  it was a person, not an animal.  Maybe he was crazy-mad because he was hoping to find a book?  New hinges were bought, and the Little Free Pantry is open again, fingers crossed.

Each one of these carefully built, gaily decorated, and communally filled mini-libraries is like one of those magic boxes in fairy tales that, no matter how much you draw from it, is never empty, but always refills with a new treasure.  Every time I pass one and open the door, I might find a book I will never want to give away.  And if not, I’ll be able to try again. Thanks to all my librarian neighbors!

 

 

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